In silico identification of molecular mimicry between t-cell epitodes of Neisseria meningitidis B and the human proteome

Authors

  • Alexander Batista-Duharte Centro de Toxicología y Biomedicina, Universidad de Ciencias Médicas de Santiago de Cuba. Santiago de Cuba, Cuba. Médico inmunólogo, doctor en Ciencias Médicas.
  • Bruno Téllez Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Departamento de Biología, Universidad de Oriente. Santiago de Cuba, Cuba. licenciado en Biología.
  • Maybia Tamayo Centro de Toxicología y Biomedicina, Universidad de Ciencias Médicas de Santiago de Cuba. Santiago de Cuba, Cuba. licenciada en Farmacia, máster en Biotecnología.
  • Deivys Portuondo Centro de Toxicología y Biomedicina, Universidad de Ciencias Médicas de Santiago de Cuba. Santiago de Cuba, Cuba. licenciado en Biología, máster en Biotecnología
  • Osmir Cabrera Instituto Finlay. Ciudad Habana, Cuba. doctor en Ciencias de la Salud.
  • Gustavo Sierra Instituto Finlay. Ciudad Habana, Cuba. médico inmunólogo, doctor en Ciencias Médicas.
  • Oliver Pérez Instituto Finlay. Ciudad Habana, Cuba. médico inmunólogo, doctor en Ciencias Médicas

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17843/rpmesp.2013.303.281

Keywords:

Molecular mimicry, Vaccines, Autoimmunity, Bioinformatics, Neisseria meningitidis, serogroup B

Abstract

The objective of the study was to determine the T-cell epitopes of four of the most frequent antigenic proteins of the outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis B, and to identify the most relevant sites for molecular mimicry with T-cell epitopes in humans. In order to do so, an in silico study –a type of study that uses bioinformatic tools- was carried out using SWISS-PROT/TrEMBL, SYFPEITHI and FASTA databases, which helped to determine the protein sequences, CD4 and CD8 T-cell epitope prediction, as well as the molecular mimicry with humans, respectively. Molecular similarity was found in several human proteins present in different organs and tissues such as: liver, skin and epithelial tissues, brain, lymphatic system and testicles. Of these, those found in testicles were more similar, showing the highest frequency of mimetic sequences. This finding shed light on the success of N. meningitidis B to colonize human tissues and the failure of certain vaccines against this bacterium, and it even helps to explain possible autoimmune reactions associated with the infection or vaccination.

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Published

2014-03-11

Issue

Section

Research Articles

How to Cite

1.
Batista-Duharte A, Téllez B, Tamayo M, Portuondo D, Cabrera O, Sierra G, et al. In silico identification of molecular mimicry between t-cell epitodes of Neisseria meningitidis B and the human proteome. Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica [Internet]. 2014 Mar. 11 [cited 2024 Jun. 23];30(3). Available from: https://rpmesp.ins.gob.pe/index.php/rpmesp/article/view/281