Design and evaluation of a multiepitopic protein as a candidate for a Carrion disease vaccine

Authors

  • Carlos Patricio Padilla Rojas Laboratorio de Referencia Nacional de Biotecnología y Biología Molecular, Centro Nacional de Salud Publica, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. Biólogo
  • Priscila Nayu Lope Pari Laboratorio de Referencia Nacional de Biotecnología y Biología Molecular, Centro Nacional de Salud Publica, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. Biólogo
  • Lorena Santos Solis Laboratorio de Referencia Nacional de Biotecnología y Biología Molecular, Centro Nacional de Salud Publica, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. Biólogo
  • Cleidy Osorio Mogollón Laboratorio de Referencia Nacional de Biotecnología y Biología Molecular, Centro Nacional de Salud Publica, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. Biólogo
  • Lisbet Inga Angulo Laboratorio de Referencia Nacional de Biotecnología y Biología Molecular, Centro Nacional de Salud Publica, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. Biólogo
  • Henri Bailon Calderon Laboratorio de Referencia Nacional de Biotecnología y Biología Molecular, Centro Nacional de Salud Publica, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. biólogo, MSc
  • Adolfo Marcelo Ñique Laboratorio de Referencia Nacional de Biotecnología y Biología Molecular, Centro Nacional de Salud Publica, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. Biólogo
  • Jackeline Morales Laboratorio de Vacunas Virales, Centro Nacional de Producción de Biológicos, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. médico veterinario, BSc
  • Gladis Esther Ventura Egusquiza Laboratorio de Referencia Nacional de Biotecnología y Biología Molecular, Centro Nacional de Salud Publica, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. Biólogo

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17843/rpmesp.2019.363.4430

Keywords:

Bartonella infections, Bartonella bacilliformis, Computational biology, Epitopes, DNA, recombinant, Immunogenicity, vaccine

Abstract

Objectives. To design and assess a multiepitopic protein as a candidate for a vaccine against Carrion disease. Materials and Methods. Using bioinformatics tools, epitopes of external membrane proteins were selected and a multiepitopic protein was designed. The multiepitopic protein gene was subcloned into the expression plasmid pET28b and transformed into E. coli BL21 pLys. The multiepitopic protein was expressed using isopropyl-β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside and purified using resin. This purified protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice obtaining polyclonal antibodies. In vitro invasion assays were conducted using a strain of Bartonella bacilliformis (B. bacilliformis) in human red blood cells. Results. The multiepitopic protein M1 presents preserved epitopes between isolates of B. bacilliformis with are non-toxic, and not homologous to human and surface proteins. Immunized mice presented IgG antibody levels capable of reducing in vitro the rate of invasion of B. bacilliformis into human red blood cells. Conclusions. Multiepitopic protein M1 may serve as a candidate for a Carrion disease vaccine; however, more studies are needed to characterize the use of this antigen as a vaccine.

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Published

2019-09-23

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Section

Original Article

How to Cite

1.
Padilla Rojas CP, Lope Pari PN, Santos Solis L, Osorio Mogollón C, Inga Angulo L, Bailon Calderon H, et al. Design and evaluation of a multiepitopic protein as a candidate for a Carrion disease vaccine. Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica [Internet]. 2019 Sep. 23 [cited 2024 Apr. 16];36(3):414-22. Available from: https://rpmesp.ins.gob.pe/index.php/rpmesp/article/view/4430

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