Economic income in Peruvian physicians according to the specialty: a cross-sectional analysis of the ENSUSALUD 2015

Authors

  • Alvaro Taype-Rondan CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú
  • J. Smith Torres-Roman Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional San Luis Gonzaga. Ica, Perú.
  • Percy Herrera-Añazco Escuela de Medicina, Universidad de Ciencias Aplicadas. Lima, Perú. Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo. Lima, Perú.
  • Carlos Alva Diaz Unidad de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú. Red de Eficacia Clínica y Sanitaria (REDECS), Lima, Perú.
  • Ana Brañez-Condorena Asociación para el Desarrollo de la Investigación Estudiantil en Ciencias de la Salud – ADIECS. Lima, Perú.
  • Miguel G. Moscoso-Porras Asociación para el Desarrollo de la Investigación Estudiantil en Ciencias de la Salud – ADIECS. Lima, Perú.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17843/rpmesp.2017.342.2517

Keywords:

Wages and benefits, Human resources, Emigration and immigration

Abstract

Objectives. To evaluate the relationship between having a medical specialty and the monthly income of Peruvian doctors, and to compare the economic incomes among areas with higher and lower density of medical doctors in Peru. Materials and methods. We analyzed data of the National Satisfaction Survey of Health Users (in Spanish: ENSUSALUD) carried out in Peru in the year 2015. This survey, with a national level of inference, was performed on physicians working at health facilities in Peru. Monthly income was measured considering all paid activities of the physician. Crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR and aPR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated through Poisson regression models with robust variance, taking into account the complex sampling of the survey. Results. Out of 2 219 Physicians surveyed, 2 154 (97.0%) observations were analyzed. The probability of earning > S/5 000 (1 572.3 USD) per month was 29.1% for general practitioners; 65.6% for specialists; 63.0% for clinical specialists; 70.5% for surgeons, and 55.7% for other specialties. Compared to general practitioners, physicians with clinical, surgical, and other specialties were more likely to earn > S/5 000 per month (aPR = 1.44, 1.49, and 1.26, respectively). The probability of earning > S/5 000 was higher in those working in departments with low medical density. Conclusions. Monthly incomes were higher for specialist physicians than for non-specialists. Economic incomes were higher in departments with lower density of physicians, which may encourage physicians to work in these departments.

Objectives. To evaluate the relationship between having a medical specialty and the monthly income of Peruvian

doctors, and to compare the economic incomes among areas with higher and lower density of medical doctors in

Peru. Materials and methods. We analyzed data of the National Satisfaction Survey of Health Users (in Spanish:

ENSUSALUD) carried out in Peru in the year 2015. This survey, with a national level of inference, was performed on physicians working at health facilities in Peru. Monthly income was measured considering all paid activities of the physician. Crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR and aPR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated through Poisson regression models with robust variance, taking into account the complex sampling of the survey. Results. Out of 2 219 Physicians surveyed, 2 154 (97.0%) observations were analyzed. The probability of earning > S/5 000 (1 572.3 USD) per month was 29.1% for general practitioners; 65.6% for specialists; 63.0% for clinical specialists; 70.5% for surgeons, and 55.7% for other specialties. Compared to general practitioners, physicians with clinical, surgical, and other specialties were more likely to earn > S/5 000 per month (aPR = 1.44, 1.49, and 1.26, respectively). The probability of earning > S/5 000 was higher in those working in departments with low medical density. Conclusions. Monthly incomes were higher for specialist physicians than for non-specialists. Economic incomes were higher in departments with lower density of physicians, which may encourage physicians to work in these departments.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Published

2017-06-28

Issue

Section

Original Article

How to Cite

1.
Taype-Rondan A, Torres-Roman JS, Herrera-Añazco P, Alva Diaz C, Brañez-Condorena A, Moscoso-Porras MG. Economic income in Peruvian physicians according to the specialty: a cross-sectional analysis of the ENSUSALUD 2015. Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica [Internet]. 2017 Jun. 28 [cited 2024 May 27];34(2):183-91. Available from: https://rpmesp.ins.gob.pe/index.php/rpmesp/article/view/2517

Most read articles by the same author(s)

1 2 > >>