Social representations related to anemia in children under three years in Awajún and Wampis communities of Peru

Authors

  • Julio Mayca-Pérez Ministerio de Desarrollo Social e Inclusión Social. Lima, Perú. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. médico, magíster en Salud Pública http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5314-8098
  • Armando Medina-Ibañez Ministerio de Desarrollo Social e Inclusión Social. Lima, Perú. Antropólogo, doctor en Humanidades
  • José E. Velásquez-Hurtado Ministerio de Desarrollo Social e Inclusión Social. Lima, Perú. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. médico, magíster en Salud Pública
  • Luis F. Llanos-Zavalaga Ministerio de Desarrollo Social e Inclusión Social. Lima, Perú. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. médico, magíster en Políticas, Planificación y Financiamiento en Salud.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17843/rpmesp.2017.343.2870

Keywords:

Qualitative research, Social perception, Population groups, Indigenous population, Anemia, Child

Abstract

Objectives. To understand the social representations of the Awajún and Wampis communities related to the symptoms and treatment of anemia in children younger than 3 years, as well as the relationship of these representations with the symbolism, constructs, and type of diet of these populations. Materials and methods. This qualitative study was conducted from June to August 2015 in the districts of Río Santiago, Cenepa, and Nieva (Amazon region, Peru), and included in-depth interviews (IDIs) of health personnel, community authorities, parents, and focus groups (FGs) for mothers. Results. A total of 38 IDIs and 13 FGs were conducted. The evaluated populations had limited awareness about anemia and health personnel, but anemia with symptoms were correlated with social representations and cultural manifestations. This behavior was reflected in the parents’ choice of treatments that were not necessarily the same as those indicated by the health personnel, and these social groups preferred the consumption of certain foods that were considered to cure the "putsumat". Visiting a health care center or using micronutrients was not their first treatment option. Conclusions. Social representations and traditional practices still exist, and include interpretative systems in health, disease, and disease management. The logic, meaning, and coherence of these practices depend on the cultural group considered. The "putsumat" or "putsuju" is an interpretive model for anemia, and the symptoms in children include pallor, thinness, and fatigue; this model is based on the cultural system of the Awajún and Wampis populations.

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Published

2017-09-29

Issue

Section

Original Article

How to Cite

1.
Mayca-Pérez J, Medina-Ibañez A, Velásquez-Hurtado JE, Llanos-Zavalaga LF. Social representations related to anemia in children under three years in Awajún and Wampis communities of Peru. Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica [Internet]. 2017 Sep. 29 [cited 2024 Jun. 23];34(3):414-22. Available from: https://rpmesp.ins.gob.pe/index.php/rpmesp/article/view/2870