Myths about organ donation on health personnel, potential recipients and families of potential donors in a peruvian hospital: qualitative study

Authors

  • Katherine Gómez-Rázuri Escuela de Medicina. Universidad Católica Santo Toribio de Mogrovejo. Chiclayo, Perú.
  • José Ballena-López Escuela de Medicina. Universidad Católica Santo Toribio de Mogrovejo. Chiclayo, Perú.
  • Franco León-Jiménez Escuela de Medicina. Universidad Católica Santo Toribio de Mogrovejo. Chiclayo, Perú. Hospital Regional de Lambayeque. Chiclayo, Perú.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17843/rpmesp.2016.331.2011

Keywords:

Folklore, Tissue and organ procurement, Organ transplantation, Brain death, Organ trafficking, Qualitative analysis

Abstract

Objectives. To explore the myths about organ donation in a national hospital in Lambayeque, Peru, in 2014. Materials and methods. A qualitative-phenomenological study was conducted with twenty-four depth unstructured interviews to: health personnel, receptor potential and families of potential donors. Sampling was intentional opinion-based, completed by theoretical saturation of each establishment. An interview guide was used, which was evaluated by five experts. Triangulation of data was performed. Results. Twenty-three respondents (95,8%) showed a favorable toward organ donation attitude. In the National Identity, thirteen (54,2%) expressing “no” to donation. The myths were: age or diseases are contraindications to donation; the recipient of an organ undergoes attitudes and feelings of their donor and lives in it; brain death is immobility of the body and a reversible state; religions do not accept organ donation, it affects physical integrity and resurrection; and there are preferences in the waiting list and exist organ trafficking. Conclusions. Myths explored in this study show religious, socio-cultural, psychological and ethical perspectives. The apparent lack of knowledge of the actual diagnosis of brain death is the starting point to mark the donation process. The existence of a hospital coordinator, the role of spiritual guides and the correct information provided by media would be key parts to break down these myths.

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Published

2016-03-23

Issue

Section

Original Article

How to Cite

1.
Gómez-Rázuri K, Ballena-López J, León-Jiménez F. Myths about organ donation on health personnel, potential recipients and families of potential donors in a peruvian hospital: qualitative study. Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica [Internet]. 2016 Mar. 23 [cited 2024 Jun. 19];33(1):83-91. Available from: https://rpmesp.ins.gob.pe/index.php/rpmesp/article/view/2011

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